IFRS 15, revenue policies, judgements, estimates, paras 110-122 certain disclosures, telecoms

Rogers Communications Inc. – Annual report – 31 December 2019

Industry: telecoms

NOTE 2: SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (extract)
NOTE 5: REVENUE
ACCOUNTING POLICY
Contracts with customers
We record revenue from contracts with customers in accordance with the five steps in IFRS 15, Revenue from contracts with customers as follows:

  1. identify the contract with a customer;
  2. identify the performance obligations in the contract;
  3. determine the transaction price, which is the total consideration provided by the customer;
  4. allocate the transaction price among the performance obligations in the contract based on their relative fair values; and
  5. recognize revenue when the relevant criteria are met for each performance obligation.

Many of our products and services are sold in bundled arrangements (e.g. wireless devices and voice and data services). Items in these arrangements are accounted for as separate performance obligations if the item meets the definition of a distinct good or service. We also determine whether a customer can modify their contract within predefined terms such that we are not able to enforce the transaction price agreed to, but can only contractually enforce a lower amount. In situations such as these, we allocate revenue between performance obligations using the minimum enforceable rights and obligations and any excess amount is recognized as revenue as it is earned.

Revenue for each performance obligation is recognized either over time (e.g. services) or at a point in time (e.g. equipment). For performance obligations satisfied over time, revenue is recognized as the services are provided. These services are typically provided, and thus revenue is typically recognized, on a monthly basis. Revenue for performance obligations satisfied at a point in time is recognized when control of the item (or service) transfers to the customer. Typically, this is when the customer activates the goods (e.g. in the case of a wireless device) or has physical possession of the goods (e.g. other equipment).

The table below summarizes the nature of the various performance obligations in our contracts with customers and when we recognize performance on those obligations.

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We also recognize interest revenue on credit card receivables using the effective interest method in accordance with IFRS 9.

Payment for Wireless and Cable monthly service fees is typically due 30 days after billing. Payment for Wireless and Cable equipment is typically due either upon receipt of the equipment or over the subsequent 24 months (when equipment is financed through our equipment financing plans). Payment terms for typical Media performance obligations range from immediate (e.g. Toronto Blue Jays tickets) to 30 days (e.g. advertising contracts).

Contract assets and liabilities
We record a contract asset when we have provided goods and services to our customer but our right to related consideration for the performance obligation is conditional on satisfying other performance obligations. Contract assets primarily relate to our rights to consideration for the transfer of wireless devices.

We record a contract liability when we receive payment from a customer in advance of providing goods and services. This includes subscriber deposits, deposits related to Toronto Blue Jays ticket sales, and amounts subscribers pay for services and subscriptions that will be provided in future periods.

We account for contract assets and liabilities on a contract-by-contract basis, with each contract presented as either a net contract asset or a net contract liability accordingly.

Deferred commission cost assets
We defer, to the extent recoverable, the incremental costs we incur to obtain or fulfill a contract with a customer and amortize them over their expected period of benefit. These costs include certain commissions paid to internal and external representatives that we believe to be recoverable through the revenue earned from the related contracts. We therefore defer them as deferred commission cost assets in other assets and amortize them to operating costs over the pattern of the transfer of goods and services to the customer, which is typically evenly over either 12 or 24 consecutive months.

USE OF ESTIMATES AND JUDGMENTS
ESTIMATES
We use estimates in the following key areas:
• determining the transaction price of our contracts requires estimating the amount of revenue we expect to be entitled to for delivering the performance obligations within a contract; and
• determining the stand-alone selling price of performance obligations and the allocation of the transaction price between performance obligations.

Determining the transaction price
The transaction price is the amount of consideration that is enforceable and to which we expect to be entitled in exchange for the goods and services we have promised to our customer. We determine the transaction price by considering the terms of the contract and business practices that are customary within that particular line of business. Discounts, rebates, refunds, credits, price concessions, incentives, penalties, and other similar items are reflected in the transaction price at contract inception.

Determining the stand-alone selling price and the allocation of the transaction price
The transaction price is allocated to performance obligations based on the relative stand-alone selling prices of the distinct goods or services in the contract. The best evidence of a stand-alone selling price is the observable price of a good or service when the entity sells that good or service separately in similar circumstances and to similar customers. If a stand-alone selling price is not directly observable, we estimate the stand-alone selling price taking into account reasonably available information relating to the market conditions, entity-specific factors, and the class of customer.

In determining the stand-alone selling price, we allocate revenue between performance obligations based on expected minimum enforceable amounts to which Rogers is entitled. Any amounts above the minimum enforceable amounts are recognized as revenue as they are earned.

JUDGMENTS
We make significant judgments in determining whether a promise to deliver goods or services is considered distinct, in determining the costs that are incremental to obtaining of fulfilling a contract with a customer, and in determining whether our residual value arrangements constitute revenue-generating arrangements or leases.

Distinct goods and services
We make judgments in determining whether a promise to deliver goods or services is considered distinct. We account for individual products and services separately if they are distinct (i.e. if a product or service is separately identifiable from other items in the bundled package and if the customer can benefit from it). The consideration is allocated between separate products and services in a bundle based on their stand-alone selling prices. For items we do not sell separately (e.g. third-party gift cards), we estimate stand-alone selling prices using the adjusted market assessment approach.

Determining costs to obtain or fulfill a contract
Determining the costs we incur to obtain or fulfill a contract that meet the deferral criteria within IFRS 15 requires us to make significant judgments. We expect incremental commission fees paid to internal and external representatives as a result of obtaining contracts with customers to be recoverable.

Residual value arrangements
Under certain customer offers, we allow customers to defer a component of the device cost until contract termination. We use judgment in determining whether these arrangements constitute revenue-generating arrangements or leases. In making this determination, we use judgment to assess the extent of control over the devices that passes to our customer, including whether the customer has a significant economic incentive at contract inception to return the device at contract termination.

EXPLANATORY INFORMATION
CONTRACT ASSETS
Below is a summary of the current and long-term portions of contract assets from contracts with customers and the significant changes in those balances during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

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CONTRACT LIABILITIES
Below is a summary of the current portion of contract liabilities from contracts with customers and the significant changes in those balances during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018.

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DEFERRED COMMISSION COST ASSETS
Below is a summary of the changes in the deferred commission cost assets recognized from the incremental costs incurred to obtain contracts with customers during the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018. The deferred commission cost assets are presented within other current assets (when they will be amortized into net income within twelve months of the date of the financial statements) or other long-term assets.

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UNSATISFIED PORTIONS OF PERFORMANCE OBLIGATIONS
The table below shows the revenue we expect to recognize in the future related to unsatisfied or partially satisfied performance obligations as at December 31, 2019. The unsatisfied portion of the transaction price of the performance obligations relates to monthly services; we expect to recognize it over the next three to five years.

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We have elected to utilize the following practical expedients and not disclose:
• the unsatisfied portions of performance obligations related to contracts with a duration of one year or less; or
• the unsatisfied portions of performance obligations where the revenue we recognize corresponds with the amount invoiced to the customer.

DISAGGREGATION OF REVENUE

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