IFRS 7 paras 22A-24D, certain hedge accounting disclosures in accordance with IFRS 9 (2013)

Syngenta AG – Financial report – 31 December 2017

Industry: manufacturing

  1. Risk management of financial risks (extract)

Risk management framework

The nature of Syngenta’s business and its global presence exposes it to a range of financial risks. These risks include (i) market risks, which include potential unfavorable changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates, commodity prices and other market prices (equities, credit spreads etc.), (ii) counterparty risk and (iii) liquidity and refinancing risk.

A financial risk management framework is in place in the form of a Treasury policy approved by the Board of Directors. This policy provides guidance over all Treasury and finance related matters, is underpinned by delegated authority guidelines and is additionally supported by detailed procedures in place across Syngenta. In accordance with its Treasury policy, Syngenta actively monitors and manages financial risk with the objectives of reducing fluctuations in reported earnings and cash flows from these risks and providing economic protection against cost increases. These objectives are achieved through (a) a monthly assessment of the impact of market risks against defined risk limits (see following section), which take into account the risk appetite of Syngenta and (b) the use of a variety of derivative and non-derivative financial instruments.

Financial instruments available for use to mitigate these risks are selected by Syngenta according to the nature of the underlying risk. These instruments are designed to economically hedge underlying risks arising from operational activities and from funding and investment positions. Syngenta does not enter into any speculative financial transactions.

The fair values and the volumes of the derivatives (including the time periods being hedged and the average strike/price achieved) used to manage financial market risks are below, classified by accounting treatment: CF and FV indicate derivatives where cash flow hedge and fair value hedge accounting is applied, respectively; and M2M indicates derivatives that are marked to market through profit or loss and hedge accounting is not specifically required. The transactions are managed to minimize the potential adverse movement for the entire portfolio of the net transactional flows, rather than on an individual currency basis. As such, there is no single average strike or price of the derivatives.

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1 The fair values of derivatives are reported in the consolidated Balance Sheet as shown in Note 26

2 2,410,000 million (2016: 2,277,000 million) British thermal units

3 Mainly 2,865,096 lbs (2016: 830,985 lbs) of coffee

4 8,185,000 bushels (2016: 4,020,000 bushels) of soybean and 11,005,000 bushels (2016: 11,720,000 bushels) of corn

Of the derivatives listed in the table above, hedge accounting is applied wherever possible. Exceptions to this are derivatives where the fair value movements of the hedges and the retranslation of the underlying exposures are largely offset in profit or loss (hedging foreign exchange risk of committed monetary items); or derivatives placed, which do not fulfil the specific requirements of the accounting standard to achieve hedge accounting (hedging foreign exchange risk of uncommitted forecast transactions; commodity price risk: soft commodities, principally Brazil coffee purchases as part of barter programs).

For those transactions which are not designated for hedge accounting purposes where the transactions do not fulfil the specific requirements of the accounting standard to achieve hedge accounting, the gains and losses on those hedging instruments for the year 2017 were as follows:

  • Foreign currency forward contracts that are effective economic hedges of forecast cash flows arising from anticipated sales and purchases between Syngenta affiliates and third parties. The amount recorded in profit or loss in 2017 is a gain of $11 million (2016: loss of $10 million).
  • Commodity derivative contracts that are effective economic hedges of the anticipated purchases of raw materials or purchases, principally purchases related to corn and soybean in North America and Latin America, and the resale of various crops in barter arrangements. The amount recorded in profit or loss in respect of these derivatives in 2017 is a gain of $6 million (2016: gain of $45 million). The profit or loss impact from the corresponding forecasted transactions occurs when the related finished product inventories are sold, which is generally in the year following recognition of the gain or loss on the hedge.

Assessment of the impact of market risks

The impact of market risks is assessed using a variety of Value-at-Risk (VaR) and Earnings-at-Risk (EaR) methods. These methods are adjusted to reflect the nature of the exposures and the impact of the exposures on profit or loss of the financial year. The specific methods used to assess the impact of financial risks are described below:

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VaR and EaR calculations are risk management tools designed to statistically estimate with a pre-set probability the maximum amount of potential losses in value (VaR) or earnings (EaR) over a specific (holding) time period given current and forecast positions and possible movements in market prices. The VaR and EaR methods used by Syngenta estimate the gross impact on the consolidated financial statements if the underlying items were not hedged and the net impact of the combined underlying hedged items and the related hedging instruments. VaR and EaR calculations attempt to recognize that holding different assets and liabilities or incurring different future cash flow exposures may reduce portfolio risk through diversification. Such diversification effects are captured within the calculations, which aim to present the risk based on Syngenta’s currency exposure as a whole, rather than the sum of the exposures to the individual currency pairs within the portfolio of exposures. Using historical data, the VaR and EaR calculations are designed to predict possible changes in the markets in the future at a 99 percent confidence level, with a 1 percent probability that actual results will be worse than calculated. The time horizon used to calculate the VaR figures for each risk is determined by the time period over which management forecasts and monitors changes in the risk and in Syngenta’s exposure to it and takes mitigating actions in response to those changes.

The assessment of the impact of market risks is performed monthly and the results are compared against annually defined risk limits. In cases where the net impact is higher than a risk limit, Syngenta enters into derivative financial instrument transactions in order to stay within the risk limits approved in the risk management policy. Breaches of risk limits, should they occur, are immediately reported to senior management.

Syngenta cannot predict future movements in risk variables precisely, therefore calculations of the impact of market risks neither represent actual losses nor consider the effects of potential favorable movements in underlying risk variables. Accordingly, these calculations may only be an indication of future movements to the extent the historic market patterns repeat in the future.

Foreign exchange risk

Operating worldwide exposes Syngenta to foreign exchange transaction and translation risk at both the Group and subsidiary level. Syngenta’s policy is to hedge the effect of foreign exchange translation risk on shareholders’ equity only in specific circumstances, for example to protect the value of temporary excess foreign currency denominated cash positions.

Foreign exchange transaction risk – committed

Syngenta’s individual subsidiaries predominantly transact their operational activities in their respective functional currencies. However, the globally integrated nature of Syngenta’s business results in its subsidiaries bearing some amount of transactional balance sheet risk, because some monetary items (including financial liabilities) are denominated in foreign currencies.

Such committed foreign currency exposures are largely generated by the routing of products from Syngenta’s central manufacturing sites to its foreign locations. The risk management strategy is to ensure that these committed exposures are fully hedged, unless otherwise approved by Group Treasury, for example where not deemed cost-effective or where there is no forward market for a specific currency.

The derivative instruments that Syngenta’s risk management policy allows to be used to manage the risk are foreign exchange forward contracts and cross currency swaps with the same risk (foreign exchange currency index), where the fair value movements of the hedges and the retranslation of the underlying committed exposures are largely offset in profit or loss.

The derivative instruments are placed with the same maturity as the expected cash flows of the hedged transactions so that the timing of the cash flows of the items within the hedged exposure effectively matches the timing of the cash flows of the derivative instrument.

Net committed transactional currency exposures are identified and reported on a monthly basis by business units. The impact of the hedging program can be illustrated in the VaR calculations for committed exposures, which relate to the revaluation of exposures relative to spot rates over a monthly period. The impact of interest differentials and other factors is not included in these calculations.

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At December 31, 2017, the Value-at-Risk for a one month holding period, after hedges, at a 99 percent confidence level was $5 million (December 31, 2016: $8 million).

The largest exposures arise in Swiss Franc, Russian Ruble and British Pound Sterling. Switzerland and Great Britain house large research and manufacturing sites. In recent years, due to the growth of Syngenta sales, exposures in emerging markets (particularly Brazil) have become significant.

Foreign exchange transaction risk – uncommitted

Uncommitted transactions are expected, highly probable future transactions for which Syngenta does not yet have a contractual right or obligation (mainly sales and costs).

The US dollar represents the biggest single currency for both sales and costs. However, currency mismatches arise from Syngenta having a centralized cost base, denominated mainly in Swiss francs, British pounds and US dollars, against a local selling base, denominated mainly in US dollars, Euros and various other currencies, including those in emerging markets. In addition, due to the seasonality of Syngenta’s business, the majority of sales occur during the first half of the year whereas costs tend to occur more linearly throughout the year.

The risk management objective is to minimize the impact of changes in foreign exchange rates on the operating income forecasted to result from these transactions. Syngenta considers hedging this exposure unless it can reliably expect that operating income could, without significant adverse economic impact, be protected by adjusting the pricing of forecast transactions for changes in foreign exchange rates before those transactions occur. Hedging transactions are managed to minimize the potential adverse movement for the entire portfolio of the net transactional flows, rather than on an individual currency basis. Transactions in a specific calendar year are managed cumulatively in separate portfolios.

The cumulative diversified risk of the whole portfolio can be reduced by entering into derivative transactions for a portion or the full amount of the individual transactions so that the remaining risk of the whole portfolio is at acceptable levels within clearly defined risk limits. The risk management objective is applicable for transactions in the following 24 months. Currently transactions for the next 12 month period are being hedged.

The derivative instruments that Syngenta’s risk management policy allows to be used to manage the risk are:

  • foreign exchange forward contracts and net purchased currency options with the same risk (foreign exchange currency index) which are eliminating or reducing the uncertainty in the cash flows.
  • placed mainly with the same or (to a lesser extent) with shorter maturity than the timing of the cash flows being hedged so that the timing of the cash flows of the hedged transactions effectively matches the timing of the cash flows of the derivative instrument.

The impact of the hedging program on operating income can be illustrated in the Earnings-at-Risk calculation performed for anticipated net transactional currency flows for the following year taking into account related currency hedges.

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At December 31, 2017, the total potential adverse movement for 2018 net transactional flows after hedges relative to year-end, at a 99 percent confidence level, was $119 million (December 31, 2016: $128 million).

The net resulting Earnings-at-Risk figures at December 31, 2017 decreased by $9 million compared with December 31, 2016 mainly due to lower overall volatility.

The greatest exposures being the Swiss franc, where Syngenta has a significant cost base in Switzerland with no material offsetting sales, and the Brazilian real, where a significant cost base is only partially offset by sales because sales in Brazil are largely dollarized. 

Foreign exchange transaction risk – issued financial debt and interest

Syngenta has a funding strategy which involves securing a diversification of funding sources in different markets and maintaining an optimal currency mix of debt.

This additional foreign currency exposure arises from the debt issuances in Euro and in Swiss franc under the Euro Medium Term Note (EMTN) program. The risk management objective is to minimize the impact of changes in foreign exchange rates on these foreign currency denominated debt interest and principal repayments.

The foreign exchange risk on the foreign currency denominated debt is managed mostly by derivative instruments, and to a lesser extent within a portfolio of other committed transactions, so that no material foreign currency risk remains as a result of the foreign currency denominated debt.

The derivative instruments which Syngenta’s risk management policy allows to be used to manage the risk are:

  • cross currency swaps designated as hedges of foreign exchange risk of future interest and principal payments on foreign currency financial debt which are eliminating or reducing the uncertainty in the cash flows.
  • placed mainly with the same terms as the items being hedged so that the timing of the interest and principal repayments of the hedged transactions effectively matches the timing of the cash flows of the derivative instrument.

Foreign exchange translation risk

Translation exposure arises from the consolidation of foreign currency denominated financial statements of Syngenta’s subsidiaries. This is reported as currency translation effects in OCI.

Translation risk can be significant; however, Syngenta regards its equity base to be of sufficient magnitude generally to absorb the short- to medium-term impact of exchange rate movements.

Syngenta can use both foreign currency denominated debt and net investment hedging to manage this exposure. The latter incorporates specific actions to protect the value of temporary excess foreign currency denominated cash positions. No hedging was undertaken for exposures of this type during the years ended December 31, 2017 or 2016. The exposure is deemed to be mitigated by the large net asset base of Syngenta and consequently no additional management of the exposure was undertaken in 2017 or 2016.

The table below presents the 1-month translation Value-at-Risk:

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At December 31, 2017, the Value-at-Risk for a one month holding period at a 99 percent confidence level was $392 million (December 31, 2016: $335 million). The Value-at-Risk at December 31, 2017 is higher than as of December 31, 2016 mainly driven by an overall increase in the value of the exposure.

The two largest single currency exposures arise in the Brazilian real and Swiss franc, driven by the large operations and investments in facilities in Switzerland and Brazil.

Interest rate risk

Syngenta is exposed to fluctuations in interest rates on its borrowings (including forecasted borrowings) and excess cash. While the majority of Syngenta’s borrowings have fixed interest rates, portions of Syngenta’s net borrowings, including its short-term commercial paper program, drawings under the syndicated credit facility and local borrowings, are subject to changes in short-term interest rates.

Syngenta monitors its interest rate exposures and analyzes the potential impact of interest rate movements on net interest expense. The risk management strategy involves ensuring an efficient fixed/floating mix of total debt within approved interest rate limits.

The risk can be managed by the use of interest rate derivatives relating to future interest payments of financial debt liabilities. The derivative instruments are placed with the same maturity as the expected cash flows of the hedged transactions so that the timing of the cash flows of the hedged transactions effectively matches the timing of the cash flows of the derivative instrument.

At December 31, 2017, the net amount of Earnings-at-Risk on floating rate debt due to potential changes in interest rates (a parallel shift of 100 bps was applied) was $7 million (2016: $10 million). The net amount of Earnings-at-Risk on net debt, as defined under “Capital structure” below, due to potential changes in interest rates was immaterial at December 31, 2017 and 2016.

Commodity price risks

Operating in the agribusiness sector, changes in certain commodity prices affect Syngenta’s reported operating results and cash flows. On a limited basis, Syngenta enters into derivative transactions to hedge the exposure of its cost base to commodity prices. This activity comprises oil and natural gas hedging in the UK and USA, as well as soft commodity hedging for corn and soybean purchases by the Seeds business in the USA, Canada, Brazil and Argentina, where Syngenta contracts to purchase various seed crops from growers and hedges the cost of the purchases. In barter arrangements where Syngenta sells products in exchange for receiving a certain amount of a commodity crop, Syngenta hedges the value of the crop. At December 31, 2017 and 2016, there were no material open hedging transactions for Brazil and Argentina corn and soybean price risk.

Syngenta has indirect exposure to oil price fluctuations mainly through the impact of oil prices on the cost of both raw materials, especially chemical intermediates in the Crop Protection business, and distribution activities. At December 31, 2017, there was no hedge protection in place for oil for 2018 (December 31, 2016: no hedge protection in place for oil for 2017). As the exposure to oil is indirect, Syngenta does not calculate the Earnings-at-Risk due to potential changes in oil prices.

Natural gas exposure occurs in Syngenta’s primary manufacturing sites and Syngenta is managing the exposure by hedging the main risk component, which is the natural gas market price, contractually linked to the NYMEX natural gas benchmark price. The other risk components within the exposure are immaterial.

The main objective of managing commodity price risk is to reduce the impact of commodity price changes on operating income and to provide economic protection against future cost increases. Syngenta uses fixed price contracts and derivatives (both Over-the-Counter (OTC) and exchange traded instruments, including commodity option and futures contracts) to achieve this objective. The derivative instruments are placed with the same maturity as the expected cash flows of the hedged transactions so that the timing of the cash flows of the hedged transactions effectively matches the timing of the cash flows of the derivative instrument.

At December 31, 2017, the net amount of Earnings-at-Risk due to potential changes in natural gas prices was not material. Earnings-at-Risk due to potential changes in prices of soft commodities, principally corn and soybean, assuming a 12-month holding period are presented below.

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1 As the main soft commodities are largely correlated to each other, the impact of diversification is immaterial

The Earnings-at-Risk of soft commodities is driven by their high price volatility compared to other asset classes. The hedging program reduces overall 12-month Earnings-at-Risk at December 31, 2017 to $3 million (December 31, 2016: $28 million). The decrease in net risk in 2017 is mainly due to significantly higher hedge ratios.

Derivatives and hedge accounting

Syngenta seeks to apply, wherever possible, hedge accounting to present its financial statements in accordance with the economic purpose of the hedging activity. Hedges for which hedge accounting is not adopted either (a) do not meet the requirements for hedge accounting treatment under IFRS or (b) when combined with the accounting for the underlying hedged items, impact the financial statements in a manner aligned with the economic purpose of the hedging transaction without the need to adopt hedge accounting treatment, for example hedges of monetary items denominated in foreign currency.

Syngenta determines the economic relationship between the hedged items and the hedging instruments by reviewing the critical terms of the hedged items and the hedging instruments. As a result Syngenta concludes that the risk being hedged for the hedged items and risk inherent in the hedging instruments are sufficiently aligned, there is no inherent mismatch in the hedging relationship and a 100 percent hedge ratio applies both for the actual quantities hedged and for the hedge accounting, except as described below. The impact of the critical terms is also assessed using historical scenario analysis supported by statistical methods (regression analysis).

For the hedging of foreign currency risk of uncommitted forecasted trading transactions, because the exposures are largely generated by the routing of products from Syngenta’s central manufacturing sites to its foreign locations, the profit or loss impact from the corresponding transactions occurs when the related finished product inventories are sold to third parties. When entering into derivative hedging contracts, Syngenta selects maturity dates based on the forecast period for which Syngenta holds inventories of its products for each commercial market by hedged currency exposure. Limited variability in the holding period occurs mainly due to timing of the third party sales transactions (“inventory holding period mismatch”).

For the hedging of commodity price risk of soy and corn, there is variability between the index being hedged (CBOT) and the drivers of the actual exposures (local soy elevator prices based on CBOT and Syngenta seeds production and selling prices based on CBOT). The variability is, however, limited to individual transactions within the group of transactions in this hedging program – and a hedge ratio of 100 percent is observed for the whole group of transactions.

The following table summarizes the accounting treatment, sources of ineffectiveness and the effectiveness assessment method for the identified financial market risks:

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Ineffectiveness is recognized in the consolidated income statement in Other general and administrative for hedges of uncommitted foreign currency forecast transactions, in Financial expense, net for hedges of committed foreign currency monetary items, in Financial expense, net for hedges of interest rate risk and in Cost of goods sold for hedges of commodity price risk. For the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 none of the above potential sources of ineffectiveness, individually or collectively, resulted in material amounts of actual ineffectiveness being reported for any hedge accounting relationships.

Fair Value Hedge Accounting

The amounts being reported in the statement of financial position for the fair value hedging relationships at December 31, 2017 and 2016 are as follows:

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The carrying amounts of the hedged items, including the fair value adjustments to the hedged items, are reported under Current financial debt and other financial liabilities and Financial debt and other non-current liabilities.

The change in the value of the hedged items during the period for hedge effectiveness purposes was $10 million (2016: $7 million).

Cash flow hedges

The gains/(losses) on derivative instruments recognized in and classified out of the cash flow hedge reserve during the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 were as follows. The amounts shown exclude related income tax effects, which are disclosed in Note 7.

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Amounts reclassified from the cash flow hedge reserve into profit or loss are recognized in the consolidated income statement in Other general and administrative for hedges of uncommitted foreign currency forecast transactions, in Financial expense, net for hedges of committed foreign currency monetary items and for hedges of interest rate risk and in Cost of goods sold for hedges of commodity price risk.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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